As your cannabis operation enters the second half of 2020, it is important to review new state and local compliance requirements that take effect on July 1. Take a look at new and updated laws in your state that will impact minimum wage, Paid Family and Medical Leave, unemployment insurance tax and more. 

All laws effective July 1, 2020 unless otherwise noted. This list only includes states that have a regulated cannabis market in place. Please reference your state's department of labor website fore more information. 

California  |  Colorado  |  Washington D.C.  |  Florida Illinois  |  Maryland  |  Minnesota  |  New Jersey  |  New Mexico  |  Nevada  |  Ohio  |  Oregon  |  Vermont

 

California

Topic Law details Impact on your business
Paid Family Leave

Increase in Paid Family Leave benefits extended to 8 weeks from 6 weeks.

Learn more from the Employee Development Department here.
Minimum Wage

Many local ordinances will still have a minimum wage increase as of July 1. Note: some of these will differ further depending on the size of the employer.

Increases taking place in; Alameda, Berkley, Emeryville, Fremont, LA, Malibu, Novato, Pasadena, San Francisco, San Leandro, Santa Monica, Santa Rosa, Hayward* and San Carlos* (*voted to delay increase).

Keep updated as other local ordinances may vote to delay this to January 2021. You may want to evaluate your company compensation to stay competitive in the market.

Contact Wurk for details.

Colorado

Topic Law Details Impact on your business
Unclaimed Wages Colorado has amended unclaimed wage reporting. Details here. Be familiar with this new law and reporting requirements.

Washington D.C.

Topic Law Details Impact on your business
Paid Family Leave Employees may access universal paid leave benefits. Details here. Notice Requirements for this law were required as of February 2020. Be sure you are in compliance with the new hire, poster, and annual notices.

Florida

Topic Law Details Impact on your business
Unemployment Insurance Tax  Florida amends unemployment tax reporting and payment requirements. Details here.  

Illinois

Topic Law Details Impact on your business
Discrimination Human Rights Act expanded: Expands the definition of an employer from 15 employees to those with 1 or more; The new definition of “employer” means that small businesses in Illinois may be subject to race, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, religion, and age discrimination claims and other claims that currently may be brought only against employers with 15 or more employees. Larger, multi-state businesses that employ one or more Illinois workers also become Illinois employers covered by the new definition.

Small businesses should ensure their policies and handbook are up to date to include these changes.

Contact Wurk for assistance.

Minimum Wage Chicago and Cook County have increases (depending on the size of the employer)

Ensure you meet this minimum and update as necessary if your business has grown from a small employer to a large employer.

Predictive Scheduling Chicago Fair Workweek Ordinance: The Ordinance will require employers covered to provide advance notice of work schedules to their covered employees, and to pay additional wages if posted schedules are changed within a certain time period. The Ordinance also requires employers to offer additional hours to existing employees before hiring new employee. Starting July 1, 2020, Chicago’s Fair Workweek Ordinance will take effect for businesses with at least 100 employees

It will be important to be aware of this law as/when you reach 100 employees.

Maryland

Topic Law Details Impact on your business
Sexual Harassment Requires Sexual Harassment Settlement Reporting per the Sexual Harassment Disclosure Reporting Act. Applies to businesses with 50 or more employees.

Employers can electronically submit their responses by visiting the commission on Civil Rights website. Consider Harassment training for your workforce.

Contact Wurk for assistance.

Minimum Wage Minimum Wage increases take place in Montgomery. There are differences per large and small employer in this local ordinance.

It will be important to stay up-to-date on this as your company grows and reaches different employee sizes.

Minnesota

Topic Law Details Impact on your business
Minimum Wage Minimum Wage increases take place in Minneapolis and St. Paul. There are differences per large and small employer in this local ordinance.

It will be important to stay up-to-date on this as your company grows and reaches different employee sizes.

New Jersey

Topic Law Details Impact on your business
Minimum Wage Increases temporary disability and paid family leave benefits. Details here.

Be familiar with this in the event your staff has questions.

New Mexico

Topic Law Details Impact on your business
Paid Time Off Bernalillo County, New Mexico Adopts Paid Leave For “Any Reason” Law: the Employee Wellness Act will require employers within the unincorporated limits of Bernalillo County to permit most employees to accrue paid time off and use that paid time off for any reason. While the ordinance was originally considered earlier this summer as a more traditional paid sick leave law, it was amended to allow for employees to use the time off for “any reason.”

Be in compliance and add this policy to your handbook as well as your payroll/HRIS system. 

Nevada

Topic Law Details Impact on your business
Minimum Wage Minimum wage increases state-wide. Details here.

It will be important to note this as it may impact NV overtime laws.

Ohio

Topic Law Details Impact on your business
Salary History and Pay Scale Toledo, OH Restricts Salary History Inquiries and Requires Pay Scale Disclosure. Details here.

Train anyone in a hiring position at your company on these new laws.

Oregon

Topic Law Details Impact on your business
Discrimination  Oregon Requires Notice of Pregnancy and Lactation Rights to Current Employees: Be familiar with the current pregnancy rights and lactation accommodations; these policies should be included in your employee handbook.

Administer notices to employees and keep acknowledgement/ proof of notice given in their employee file.

Predictive Scheduling The law will cover nonexempt employees working for retail and other specific businesses with 500 or more employees worldwide. Certain large employers in Oregon will soon have to comply with a new predictable scheduling law by providing employees with advance notice of their work schedules and time to rest between shifts.

All employers would be required to pay an employee a minimum of four hours of wages for any shift that is cancelled or shortened on less than 24 hours' notice. In addition, all employers would be required to comply with new recordkeeping obligations to demonstrate their compliance with the law. 

Minimum Wage Minimum Wage Increase in the Portland Metro Area, Rural Counties, and non- rural counties. Details here.

Evaluate your current employee compensation to ensure compliance.

Vermont

Topic Law Details Impact on your business
Data Security Breach Notification Law Expanded Laws amended with significant overhauls including expansion of its definition of personal information. Details here.

Be familiar with this expanded law and the new definitions of personal information as this will relate to your staff information.

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